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Management Information Systems in Public and Private Organizations: An Empirical Test

Stuart Bretschneider
Public Administration Review
Vol. 50, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1990), pp. 536-545
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/976784
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/976784
Page Count: 10
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Management Information Systems in Public and Private Organizations: An Empirical Test
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Abstract

Differences between public and private organizations lie at the core of public administration's theoretical base. Empirical tests of hypothesized differences in information system management between public and private organizations strongly demonstrate the basis for such distinctions in this study. Consistent differences are identified in both the organizational environment and managerial activity of data processing organizations between sectors. A public organization's environment reflects greater interdependence and accountability, which leads in part to more red tape. Differences in the criteria used for purchasing hardware and software, planning processes, and placement of the top data processing manager reflect reasonable adjustments to management strategies and actions for coping with these different organizational environments.

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