Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Thermal Conductivities of Organic Vapours

J. D. Lambert, E. N. Staines and S. D. Woods
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Vol. 200, No. 1061 (Jan. 6, 1950), pp. 262-271
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/98485
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Thermal Conductivities of Organic Vapours
Preview not available

Abstract

The variation of thermal conductivity with pressure has been investigated for a number of organic vapours at pressures between 50 and 700 mm. and at temperatures of 25, 66 and 85 ° C. Acetaldehyde and acetonitrile show fairly large linear increases of thermal conductivity with rise in pressure, which diminish markedly as temperature rises. This is interpreted as being due to dimerization, and a quantitative treatment is given in terms of values of Kp and Δ H for the reversible dimerization process, which are derived from previous work on the second virial coefficients of these vapours. Ethyl chloride shows similar behaviour to a much smaller degree. Methyl alcohol and acetone show fairly large non-linear increases, which diminish at higher temperatures, and which are interpreted as being due to association to polymers higher than the dimer. Benzene, cyclohexane, n-hexane, chloroform and diethyl ether, together with air and carbon dioxide, all show comparatively small linear increases, which become larger as temperature rises. No satisfactory quantitative explanation was found for this effect, which appears to involve factors other than simple convection. Values of the absolute thermal conductivity, corrected to zero pressure, are given for all vapours investigated.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271