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Solubilization of Water in Non-Polar Solvents by Cationic Detergents

Santi R. Palit and V. Venkateswarlu
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Vol. 208, No. 1095 (Sep. 24, 1951), pp. 542-551
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/98751
Page Count: 10
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Solubilization of Water in Non-Polar Solvents by Cationic Detergents
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Abstract

Solubilization of water in common organic solvents by fatty acid salts of long-chain (C12 $\chembond{1,0} $C18 aliphatic primary amines was studied. It was found that, of all the salts from formate to palmitate and oleate, dodecylamine-n-butyrate and octadecylamine propionate solubilize most in xylene, the figure reaching about 29 molecules of H2O/mole of soap. Additions of free amine enhanced solubilization, while free butyric acid decreased the intake. Our viscosity and freezing-point measurements of the same systems indicated that the additive is most likely to form a complex with soap micelles, and that their solubilizing power is modified thereby. Freezing-point measurements of detergent solutions with and without the solubilized phase showed, surprisingly enough, that the dissolved water elevates the freezing-points considerably, showing that solubilized water acts as a binding agent between micelles and probably promotes micelle formation. The results are discussed and correlated on Winsor's theory of solubilization.

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