Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Money and Membership: Effects of Neighbourhood Poverty, Income Inequality and Individual Income on Voluntary Association Membership in Canada

Laura Duncan
The Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie
Vol. 35, No. 4 (2010), pp. 573-593
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/canajsocicahican.35.4.573
Page Count: 21
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Money and Membership: Effects of Neighbourhood Poverty, Income Inequality and Individual Income on Voluntary Association Membership in Canada
Preview not available

Abstract

Abstract. Examining how individual and neighbourhood economic characteristics affect membership helps us to 1) understand how access to these benefits may be restricted and 2) make policy recommendations to counter these restrictions. Applying multilevel modelling techniques to 2003 Canadian General Social Survey and 2001 Census data, this study investigates the influence of individual income, neighbourhood poverty and income inequality on voluntary association membership in Canada. As well as finding a positive effect of individual income on membership, negative effects of neighbourhood poverty are uncovered, in addition to a significant cross-level interaction between individual income and neighbourhood income inequality. Findings support claims about the negative social effects of individual and contextual economic disadvantage and confirms the importance of examining contextual influences on social outcomes. Results also indicate that policy recommendations must take into account both individual and neighbourhood characteristics when trying to motivate individual engagement.

Page Thumbnails