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Stellar Evolution

Stellar Evolution: An Exploration from the Observatory

Otto Struve
Copyright Date: 1950
Pages: 296
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt183pt1m
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    Stellar Evolution
    Book Description:

    The book description for "Stellar Evolution" is currently unavailable.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-7627-3
    Subjects: Physics
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-viii)
  2. PREFACE (pp. ix-xii)
    Otto Struve
  3. Table of Contents (pp. xiii-2)
  4. I PROBING THE STARS’ CHEMICAL COMPOSITION (pp. 3-97)

    Perhaps the most remarkable property of the starry sky is the tremendous diversity among the apparent brightnesses of the individual stars. The brightest of the fixed stars, Sirius, is almost two billion times more luminous, as seen from the earth, than the faintest stars that can be photographed with our most powerful telescopes. We realize at once that this diversity in apparent luminosity must indicate a large range in stellar distances; and, in fact, one hundred years ago astronomers tried to derive these distances upon the assumption that the intrinsic luminosities of the stars are all approximately the same. But...

  5. [Illustrations] (pp. None)
  6. II SOME PROBLEMS OF STELLAR EVOLUTION (pp. 98-153)

    The amount of radiant energy which is produced by the sun and emitted into space amounts to about 1041ergs per year. At the present time the sun contains, within its mass, radiant energy amounting to about 3 × 1047ergs, translational energy of the atoms and electrons amounting to about 3 × 1048ergs, and energy of ionization and excitation amounting to about 3 × 1048ergs. All these immediately available stores of energy would suffice to cover the sun’s annual expenditure of energy over a period of only about fifty million years, and this is entirely insufficient to...

  7. [Illustrations] (pp. None)
  8. III THE ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT OF CLOSE DOUBLE STARS (pp. 154-259)

    It has been estimated that at least one-fifth of all the stars are binary systems. In Figure 3 we demonstrated the distribution of 39 stars which are closer to the sun than 5 parsecs. Of these, 21 are believed to be single, 7 are double (but for two of these only one component could be plotted), and 2 are triple. It is clear that the existence of multiple stars must be regarded as a common occurrence among the building blocks of our galaxy. Somewhat similar results have been obtained in other ways. For example, from a discussion of the stars...

  9. [Illustrations] (pp. None)
  10. Index (pp. 260-266)