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Press and Foreign Policy

Press and Foreign Policy

BERNARD C. COHEN
Copyright Date: 1963
Pages: 298
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt183q0fp
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    Press and Foreign Policy
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    The book description for "Press and Foreign Policy" is currently unavailable.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-7861-1
    Subjects: Political Science
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-ix)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. x-2)
  3. CHAPTER I A SETTING (pp. 3-16)

    ONE HARDLY NEEDS to justify or explain an interest in the relation between the press and foreign policy in American political life; indeed, there is scarcely a person alert and sensitive to foreign affairs who has not at one time or another pondered some aspect of this problem. It is surprising, therefore, to discover that this concern has never been translated into systematic explorations of the relationship of the press and foreign policy, either by journalists or by students of government and policy.¹ Studies of the press, of which there are many, deal only tangentially with foreign policy; and in...

  4. CHAPTER II THE REPORTER AND HIS WORK (pp. 17-53)

    THE WEB of interaction that connects the press, the policy maker, and the external environment is very closely woven; one has to cut into it somewhere, and we have chosen to begin by focusing on the press and on the way it gathers and produces foreign policy news. As a first step, we shall look at the foreign affairs reporter himself, being especially interested in how he views the processes of democratic foreign policy-making, and in the way he conceives the function of the press in those processes. We do this because it seems useful to preface our inquiry into...

  5. CHAPTER III GETTING THE NEWS (pp. 54-104)

    BEFORE we discuss the actual behavior of foreign affairs correspondents in the processes of news-gathering, it is important to spell out in a preliminary way what “news” seems to mean to them. For the approaches to newsgathering that prevail among these reporters reflect the fact that there are no precise definitions and understandings of what constitutes news.

    Perhaps the most significant general characteristic of news, as the term is commonly employed, is that its substantive connotations are usually implicit. Reporters have great difficulty in putting into words just what they are hunting for each day. The successful foreign affairs reporter...

  6. CHAPTER IV FROM NEWS TO NEWS PAPER (pp. 105-132)

    FROM the reporter’s selection of a story to the final shape of the news in the newspaper, there are additional sequences of choice. The process from news to newspaper may be visualized as funnel-shaped. Each stage in the process slightly narrows the dimensions of the news that the next stage has to work with. At the end, in the newsrooms, the final and severe choices are made as the news runs through the small neck of the funnel into the newspaper. The temptation to say that either the early or the late stages in this process are the more significant...

  7. CHAPTER V THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER: POLICY MAKERS’ VIEWS OF THE PRESS (pp. 133-168)

    AN INQUIRY into the role of the press in foreign policy-making that examined only the behavior of the press would be one-sided, for it would miss the range of interactions that complete the circuit between press and policy maker. The “mirror” that the press holds up “by which its readers can see the world”¹ is not fashioned exclusively by the initiatives of the press, nor is it the product solely of the criteria of judgment that mark the news-gathering and editorial processes. Foreign affairs news comes out of an interplay between the correspondents and the men of responsibility whose thoughts...

  8. CHAPTER VI CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PRESS: THE OUTWARD FLOW OF NEWS (pp. 169-207)

    THE ATTITUDES that foreign policy officials entertain toward the press—the animosity and the fear, the confidence and the ambivalence—are ultimately reflected in the flow of information from these officials to the press. In prior chapters we have looked at reporters and editors as important shapers of foreign policy news; here we shall look at the policy makers themselves as sources of news by virtue of the things they choose to say about American foreign relations. (An official is also a source of news as a result of things hedoes,but the less he says about these acts,...

  9. CHAPTER VII EXTRACTIONS FROM THE PRESS: THE UTILIZATION OF NEWS (pp. 208-247)

    CONTRADICTORY and ambivalent themes mark the approach of foreign policy officials to the press, and these contradictions and inconsistencies have been reflected in prior pages. The negative attitudes toward the press and the strong depreciation of its standards and accuracy, the view that one cannot trust the newspapers or believe them or take them at face value, are all aspects of a cynical, wary outlook suggesting that the official is relatively impervious to the contents of the press, that he regards it as something vulgar that he cannot rub out of his life but that he will not permit to...

  10. CHAPTER VIII THE PRESS, THE PUBLIC, AND FOREIGN POLICY (pp. 248-263)

    AT A NUMBER of points in the preceding chapters we have referred to aspects of the problem of foreign policy judgment and decision-making by public audiences in the light of low-volume, discontinuous,post hoccoverage of foreign affairs in the American press. Here we shall confront more directly the significance of foreign policy coverage for the non-governmental side of the foreign policy-making process, beginning with the notions of the relationship of press to public and to foreign policy that prevail among practicing journalists.

    The belief among newspapermen that the citizen’s requirement for more and more information about public affairs must...

  11. CHAPTER IX CONCLUSION (pp. 264-280)

    NO MATTER where one starts in an attempt to explore the significance of the findings in the preceding chapters, one quickly comes back to the massive central issue in the debate among scholars and among political and journalistic practitioners concerning the place of the press in American foreign policy-making. This issue, which we can abbreviate here as the competing demands of diplomacy and democracy on the organization and conduct of foreign affairs reporting, is clearly at the base of many of the attitudes and modes of behavior we have been discussing. The argument between those who attach the highest priorities...

  12. INDEX (pp. 281-288)