Access

You are not currently logged in.

Login through your institution for access.

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Globalisation

Globalisation: Studies in Anthropology

Edited by Thomas Hylland Eriksen
Copyright Date: 2003
Published by: Pluto Press
Pages: 248
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt18fs8zb
Find more content in these subjects:
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Globalisation
    Book Description:

    Globalisation has had a massive impact on the teaching and practice of anthropology. This important new book, edited by leading anthropologist Thomas Hylland Eriksen, addresses the methodological problems that these changes have wrought, and in doing so fills a major gap in the contemporary study and teaching of anthropology. The essays in this book show how the focus has shifted from traditional studies of specific sites, towards the movements and shifts assoicated with increasing migration and population flows -- the result of living in an increasingly globalised world. Written by a range of distinguished anthropologists, it offers innovative new approaches to the discipline in the light of these changes, making it indispensable as a teaching text, at higher levels, and as mandatory reading for practitioners and researchers in a wide range of merging disciplines. Topics explored include the methodology of studying on the internet; global and spatial identities in the Caribbean; shifting boundaries in coastal communities; the anthropology of political life; issues of law and the flow of human substances; and the diffusion of moral values created by globalisation.

    eISBN: 978-1-84964-187-6
    Subjects: Anthropology
    × Close Overlay

Table of Contents

Export Selected Citations
  1. Front Matter (pp. iii-iv)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. v-v)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS (pp. vi-vi)
  4. 1 INTRODUCTION (pp. 1-17)
    Thomas Hylland Eriksen

    Although the term ‘globalisation’ has been common in anthropology and neighbouring disciplines only since around 1990, it has spawned an impressive range of books, journal articles and academic conferences. In the mid-1990s, it actually seemed more difficult to find a major sociology or social anthropology conference that didnotfeature the word prominently in its programme, than to find one that did.

    In spite of the flurry of interdisciplinary activity around the term ‘globalisation’, the need for new studies will not go away until the phenomena they describe disappear. Moreover, there still remains necessary work to be done on the...

  5. 2 SEVERAL SITES IN ONE (pp. 18-38)
    Ulf Hannerz

    When the evening comes, I sit down in front of our TV, switch to perhaps CNN or BBC World, and sometimes a familiar face turns up – hello Mike, hello Lyse! And the next morning, when I glance through the Stockholm morning papers, it feels nice to come upon some especially familiar signatures – hi Leif, Göran, Cordelia ...

    What is all this? It is a result of a social anthropological study I have been involved with over the several years, of news-media foreign correspondents, their work and working conditions. Because of the study, some of the people whom I...

  6. 3 ETHNOGRAPHY AND THE EXTREME INTERNET (pp. 39-57)
    Daniel Miller and Don Slater

    If one is looking for the best possible image of a global phenomenon, then the internet undoubtedly provides it. But not the internet as either a technology or a practice, but rather the internet as a discourse. Recall the scene circa 1999, the globe, that is all that part of the population that was concerned with this phenomenon speaks with one voice, no exceptions, no dissent, one voice, one certainty, one clear vision of the future. From Alaska to Australia you are being told that if you want even to be part of that future, to actually be present in...

  7. 4 GLOBAL PLACES AND PLACE-IDENTITIES – LESSONS FROM CARIBBEAN RESEARCH (pp. 58-77)
    Karen Fog Olwig

    A cartoon published in the weekly magazineThe New Yorkerin 2001 showed two middle-aged men chatting in a local bar. One of them, obviously on his way home from work, is bald and is wearing a suit, white shirt and tie, and is holding a drink. The other has longer hair, is wearing a T-shirt and drinking beer, and seems to be rather out of touch with the pulsating life in the wider world. The beer drinker says, ‘Look, I’ve got nothing against globalization, just as long as it’s not in my backyard’ (Mankoff, 2001). The cartoon is amusing...

  8. 5 INTO OUR TIME: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF POLITICAL LIFE IN THE ERA OF GLOBALISATION (pp. 78-98)
    Christian Krohn-Hansen

    How can anthropologists usefully examine and write about the contemporary world? How should we study political life in the era of globalisation? The purpose of this chapter is to sketch a set of answers to these questions. Given the questions’ high level of abstraction and enormous scope, anybody would be foolish to imagine that he or she could offer more than partial solutions.

    A reinvigorated anthropology about the world at present must recognise how indispensable it is to explode a deep-rooted theory about the world. Too much anthropology still contributes to the maintenance of the old (historical, political, economic and...

  9. 6 SHIFTING BOUNDARIES OF A COASTAL COMMUNITY: TRACING CHANGES ON THE MARGIN (pp. 99-121)
    Marianne E. Lien

    Anthropology, known by disciplinary neighbours for dealing with practically every aspect of human society, has been remarkably slow in coming to terms with global forms of connectedness. This is in spite of a recent theoretical turn in the discipline away from the idea of what Gupta and Ferguson (1999) call the paradigm of ‘peoples and cultures’, and in spite of analyses that convincingly demonstrate the salience of transnational connections historically and today (e.g. Mintz, 1985). The implications of such insights for anthropological research practice, however, remain unclear. Anthropologists’ unease in relation to global connectivities clearly may be understood as a...

  10. 7 CONSIDERING GLOBAL/LOCAL RELATIONS: BEYOND DUALISM (pp. 122-137)
    Knut G. Nustad

    The point of departure for this chapter is what appear to me to be some inconsistencies in the way in which the conceptual pair local and global is deployed. There are a bewildering number of definitions of globalisation and the global. A dividing line can be drawn between those, following Wallerstein, who discern an underlying force behind globalisation, such as the intensification of economic relations across national boundaries (e.g. Held, 1995; Rosenau, 1990) and those who focus on a cultural process involving homogenisation and diversification (Appadurai, 1991; Robertson, 1995). Jonathan Friedman (1994, 1995) distinguishes between the two and argues that...

  11. 8 ANTHROPOLOGIES IN POLICIES, ANTHROPOLOGIES IN PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON FIELDWORK ‘IN’ DOCUMENTS AND POLICIES (pp. 138-157)
    Simone Abram

    Globalisation studies pose some conceptual problems for those wishing to undertake ethnographic research. While we are well aware that apparently small or remote communities have multiple points of contact with the world around them, a preference for fieldwork based in definite geographical locations, or with kinfocused locality-linked communities threatens to confine us to examining the ‘impacts’ of globalisation on marginalised communities. While these studies have a vitally important place in the understanding of globalisation effects, we equally need to examine the processes of globalisation. In Nader’s (1972) terms, we need to ‘study up’ the scale to the powerful global networks...

  12. 9 COMMEMORATING GLOBAL ACTS: A NORWEGIAN WAY OF HOLDING AN EMIGRANT WORLD TOGETHER (pp. 158-169)
    Sarah Lund

    Part of the challenge in addressing global issues from an anthropological perspective relates to the methodological position of the ethnographic field, that is, its concreteness and the aspiration to sustain anthropological attention to micro level phenomena and processes. Engagement with the emergent nature of ethnographic localities, ones that both anchor and yet open up our perspectives on global issues, must be a preoccupation. In the light of new demands to encompass such far-flung processes, how might anthropology characterise global localities while maintaining its insistence that global factors are and always have impinged upon and been embedded in all local contexts?...

  13. 10 EXCHANGE MATTERS: ISSUES OF LAW AND THE FLOW OF HUMAN SUBSTANCES (pp. 170-197)
    Marit Melhuus

    In this chapter, I raise questions pertaining to the movement and transnational flow of biogenetic substances derived from human beings. I will explore social phenomena, which in a particular context, serve to facilitate or impede the movement of specific substances. The setting is Norway and the substances are ova and sperm.

    My overall research has been concerned with meanings of kinship in Norway and my approach to the topic has been through the many social arenas of assisted procreation. In what follows, I will not address the disparate empirical processes and articulations of assisted procreation (but see Melhuus 2000, 2001)....

  14. 11 THE DIFFUSION OF MORAL VALUES IN A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE (pp. 198-216)
    Signe Howell

    This chapter is not a defence or attack on cultural or moral relativism. That debate as it has been conducted in social anthropology has reached an impasse (see Cowan et al., 2001). My aim, however, is to examine some effects upon moral discourses in non-Western parts of the world that result from the Western Christian intellectual tradition that disregards cultural differences and imagines the world and humanity as one.¹ Bearing in mind the above quotation, I wish in this chapter to adopt a rather specific usage of the term ‘globalisation’ which I shall use to mean the normative goal tha...

  15. 12 EPILOGUE: STUDYING WORLD SOCIETY (pp. 217-227)
    Keith Hart

    Anthropologists are now studying transnational society, as this volume demonstrates admirably. For some time now I have been wondering what it would be like to studyworld society(see the Appendix on Terms of Association). These brief concluding notes point to some of the methods we might adopt to that end. Method comes from Greekmeta-hodos, meaning before (or after) the road, preparation for a journey or perhaps its destination. Each of us makes an idiosyncratic journey through life and absorbs a personal version of society in the process. The life journeys of anthropologists are more varied than most. So,...

  16. CONTRIBUTORS (pp. 228-228)
  17. INDEX (pp. 229-242)