Access

You are not currently logged in.

Login through your institution for access.

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

"This Day We Marched Again"

"This Day We Marched Again": A Union Soldier's Account of War in Arkansas and the Trans-Mississippi

Edited by Mark K. Christ
Copyright Date: 2014
Pages: 157
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1ffjqnq
Find more content in these subjects:
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    "This Day We Marched Again"
    Book Description:

    A testament to the valor and determination of a common soldier On September 17, 1861, twenty-two-year-old Jacob Haas enlisted in the Sheboygan Tigers, a company of German immigrants that became Company A of the Ninth Wisconsin Infantry Regiment. Over the next three years, Haas and his comrades marched thousands of miles and saw service in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and the Indian Territory, including pitched battles at Newtonia, Missouri, and Jenkins' Ferry, Arkansas. Haas describes the war from the perspective of a private soldier and an immigrant as he marches through scorching summers and brutally cold winters to fight in some of the most savage combat in the west. His diary shows us an extraordinary story of the valor and determination of a volunteer soldier. Though his health was ruined by war, Haas voiced no regrets for the price he paid to fight for his adopted country.

    eISBN: 978-1-935106-68-5
    Subjects: History
    × Close Overlay

Table of Contents

Export Selected Citations
  1. Front Matter (pp. 1-6)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. 7-8)
  3. Acknowledgements (pp. 9-10)
  4. Introduction (pp. 11-18)
    Mark K. Christ

    On September 17, 1861, twenty-two-year-old Jacob Haas enlisted in the Sheboygan Tigers, a company of German immigrants that would become Company A of the Ninth Wisconsin Infantry Regiment. Over the next three years, Haas and his comrades would march thousands of miles and see service in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and the Indian Territory, including pitched battles at Newtonia, Missouri, and Jenkins’ Ferry, Arkansas. During his service, Haas kept a series of diaries, which he transcribed into a single narrative in a notebook after the war. Sometime between 1920 and 1940, his son-in-law Herman Hohenwald translated the notebook from the original...

  5. Diary of Jacob Haas As Soldier in the Civil War. (pp. 19-130)

    The first call for volunteers for the creation of a regiment of young men of German descent was given in August 1861. The special inducement was that it should be under the command of General Siegel,12who was known as a great commander and general and such we found him to be. This encouraged many, including me, to enlist. On Sept. 17th 1861, myself and many others joined the fast increasing Sheboygan Tiger Company.13

    The company very soon had over 100 men and we were ordered to come to Milwauke, the headquarters of the regiment under General Siegel. We arrived...

  6. Photographs and Maps (pp. 131-142)
  7. Bibliography (pp. 143-150)
  8. Index (pp. 151-158)
  9. About the Editor (pp. 159-161)
  10. Back Matter (pp. 162-162)