Macbeth

Macbeth

William Shakespeare
Fully annotated, with an Introduction, by Burton Raffel
With an essay by Harold Bloom
Copyright Date: 2005
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 256
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1nq91p
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  • Book Info
    Macbeth
    Book Description:

    Perhaps no other Shakespearean drama so engulfs its readers in the ruinous journey of surrender to evil as doesMacbeth.A timeless tragedy about the nature of ambition, conscience, and the human heart, the play holds a profound grip on the Western imagination.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-13827-6
    Subjects: Language & Literature
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ABOUT THIS BOOK (pp. ix-xviii)
  4. INTRODUCTION (pp. xix-xxxviii)

    LikeHamlet, Macbethis centered on its title character: Hamlet is onstage approximately 66 percent of the time, Macbeth 60 percent. Yet just as Macbeth himself is a traitor—to his king, his friends, his country, and to God—so, too, is the play steeped in both evil and betrayal. The villain ofOthello,Iago, is arguably even more unmitigatedly evil, yet his is evil of an inexplicable, deeply individual nature. We have no idea what motivates Iago to be what he is. We see no causative connection between the world he lives in and his incredibly warped actions. He...

  5. SOME ESSENTIALS OF THE SHAKESPEAREAN STAGE (pp. xxxix-xlii)
  6. Macbeth (pp. 1-168)

    Witch 1When shall we three meet again

    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?²

    Witch 2When the hurlyburly’s³ done,

    When the battle’s lost and won.

    Witch 3That will be ere⁴ the set of sun.⁵

    Witch 1Where the place?

    Witch 2Upon the heath.⁶

    Witch 3There to meet with Macbeth.

    Witch 1I come, Graymalkin!⁷

    Witch 2Paddock⁸ calls.

    Witch 3Anon!⁹

    AllFair is foul, and foul is fair.10

    Hover11through the fog12and filthy13air.

    ALARUM² WITHIN.³ ENTER DUNCAN, MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, LENNOX, WITH SERVANTS AND A BLEEDING SERGEANT

    DuncanWhat bloody⁴ man is that? He...

  7. AN ESSAY BY HAROLD BLOOM (pp. 169-204)

    Theatrical tradition has madeMacbeththe unluckiest of all Shakespeare’s plays, particularly for those who act in it. Macbeth himself can be termed the unluckiest of all Shakespearean protagonists, precisely because he is the most imaginative. A great killing machine, Macbeth is endowed by Shakespeare with something less than ordinary intelligence, but with a power of fantasy so enormous that pragmatically it seems to be Shakespeare’s own. No other drama by Shakespeare—not evenKing Lear, A Midsummer Night’s Dream,orThe Tempest—so engulfs us in a phantasmagoria. The magic inA Midsummer Night’s DreamandThe Tempestis...

  8. FURTHER READING (pp. 205-208)
  9. FINDING LIST (pp. 209-210)

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