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Doing Diversity in Higher Education

Doing Diversity in Higher Education: Faculty Leaders Share Challenges and Strategies

EDITED BY WINNIFRED R. BROWN-GLAUDE
Copyright Date: 2009
Published by: Rutgers University Press
Pages: 320
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hj3d3
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  • Book Info
    Doing Diversity in Higher Education
    Book Description:

    Using case studies from universities throughout the nation, Doing Diversity in Higher Education examines the role faculty play in improving diversity on their campuses. The power of professors to enhance diversity has long been underestimated, their initiatives often hidden from view. Winnifred Brown-Glaude and her contributors uncover major themes and offer faculty and administrators a blueprint for conquering issues facing campuses across the country. Topics include how to dismantle hostile microclimates, sustain and enhance accomplishments, deal with incomplete institutionalization, and collaborate with administrators. The contributors' essays portray working on behalf of diversity as a genuine intellectual project rather than a faculty "service."

    The rich variety of colleges and universities included provides a wide array of models that faculty can draw upon to inspire institutional change.

    eISBN: 978-0-8135-4597-4
    Subjects: Education, Sociology
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. v-viii)
  3. FOREWORD: Faculty as Change Agents–Reflections on My Academic Life (pp. ix-xiv)
    CHERYL A. WALL

    For most people in the 1970s, the image of a college professor was a bearded gray-haired white man in a corduroy blazer with patches at the elbow. I did not look the part. When I joined the English department of Douglass College, I was twenty-three years old, with a short Afro and two years of graduate study at Harvard under my belt. Alienated by the ostentatious elitism of Harvard—not to mention the sexism—I was on a mission to find out whether I wanted an academic career. I answered an ad in the New York Times, was interviewed on...

  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS (pp. xv-xviii)
  5. Introduction: Listen to the Submerged Voices–Faculty Agency in a Challenging Climate (pp. 1-14)
    WINNIFRED R. BROWN-GLAUDE

    On June 28, 2007, in a landmark decision destined to affect school districts across the country, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down two voluntary school-integration plans, one in Louisville, Kentucky, and the other in Seattle, Washington. The Court’s ruling in these joined cases challenged voluntary integration policies in K–12 schools, maintaining that such policies discriminate on the basis of race. The Court’s conservative majority found that the schools’ methods for achieving racial diversity went too far. According to Justice John Roberts, the districts “failed to show that they considered methods other than explicit racial classifications to achieve their stated...

  6. PART ONE Diversity and/as Intellectual Leadership
    • 1 Instituting a Legacy of Change: Transforming the Campus Climate at the University of Maryland through Intellectual Leadership (pp. 17-38)
      AMY MCLAUGHLIN, BONNIE THORNTON DILL, SHARON HARLEY and DEBORAH ROSENFELT

      This chapter examines the role of faculty agency and interdisciplinary collaboration in transforming the climate of diversity at the University of Maryland (UM). It suggests that faculty agency and collaboration have infused a deeper understanding of social inequality (including race, gender, ethnicity, and other dimensions of difference) into teaching, learning, and research in units across the university and beyond its walls. To illuminate these processes of intellectual, social, and institutional change, we draw from the experiences and collaboration histories of three faculty members: Bonnie Thornton Dill, director of the Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity and chair and professor of...

    • 2 Discourses of Diversity at Spelman College (pp. 39-60)
      ALMA JEAN BILLINGSLEA-BROWN and GERTRUDE JAMES GONZALEZ DE ALLEN

      Founded as a seminary for newly emancipated slave women in 1881, Spelman College traditionally educates African American women from the South. Given this tradition, issues relating to diversity at Spelman have centered not on race but on intraracial, ethnic, national, regional, socioeconomic, and cultural differences primarily within the African Diaspora. Among the central issues regarding diversity, one has been finding ways to identify, acknowledge, and celebrate difference within a population that historically has resisted incursions from those of different racial and ethnic origins, especially since for African Americans, racial unity and sameness served as a revolutionary strategy for the struggle...

    • 3 Institutional Diversity Work as Intellectual Work at the University of Missouri–Columbia (pp. 61-80)
      JENI HART, MARGARET GROGAN, JACKIE LITT and ROGER WORTHINGTON

      The University of Missouri–Columbia (MU) is the flagship institution of the four-campus University of Missouri System. Located between Kansas City and St. Louis, it is the home of more than 1,200 ranked, full-time, tenure-track faculty members who serve more than 28,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. A Carnegie research university, MU maintains international collaborations with institutions in South Africa, China, North and South Korea, and elsewhere and is home to one of ten European Union centers. Although students come from all fifty states as well as ninety-eight nations, most are from Missouri and reflect regional demographics. The greatest numbers...

  7. PART TWO Dismantling/Challenging Hostile Micro/Macroclimates
    • 4 Faculty Microclimate Change at Smith College (pp. 83-102)
      MARTHA ACKELSBERG, JENI HART, NAOMI J. MILLER, KATE QUEENEY and SUSAN VAN DYNE

      The phenomenon of a “revolving door” for women and minority faculty members has been implicated as one factor hindering efforts to diversify the professoriate (Moreno et al. 2006). Recognizing that understanding the institutional factors that promote this phenomenon is the first step toward eliminating it, we undertook the study described in this chapter. Our work examines the role of microclimates in faculty retention and engagement at one private women’s liberal arts college, Smith College. While aspects of the study are no doubt specific to Smith or to other colleges with similar purpose and makeup, it is both our sense and...

    • 5 We, They, and Us: Stories of Women STEM Faculty at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (pp. 103-118)
      JOSEPHINE BRADLEY, DEBORAH COOK, DEIDRE MCDONALD and SARAH NORTH

      In this chapter we consider the oral histories, or her-stories, of women faculty members in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) at four historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in Georgia. Our study addresses the absence of these women’s experiences from larger discussions of diversity and equity in higher education. Because of the history of HBCUs and the populations they serve, there is often a presumption that diversity is not an issue there. Our research shows, however, that diversity and equity are critical issues for women STEM faculty at HBCUs and that we need a new framework...

    • 6 Unprecedented Urgency: Gender Discrimination in Faculty Hiring at the University of California (pp. 119-134)
      MARTHA S. WEST

      This is a story about a controversial approach to seeking change within higher education—tapping into political power off campus.¹ The key players, Professors Gyöngy Laky and Martha West, faculty members at the University of California Davis (UC–Davis), had reluctantly come to realize, after many years of struggle, that significant, meaningful change at the University of California (UC) would not take place by continuing to work within the UC system. Their cause: gender equity in faculty hiring. In one year the percentage of women among new faculty hires at their campus, UC–Davis, had dropped 22 points: from 35...

  8. PART THREE The Challenges of Incomplete Institutionalization
    • 7 Feminist Interventions: Creating New Institutional Spaces for Women at Rutgers (pp. 137-165)
      MARY HAWKESWORTH, LISA HETFIELD, BARBARA BALLIET and JENNIFER MORGAN

      Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, has a national reputation as a leader in diversity. During the last two decades of the twentieth century, Rutgers ranked among the top ten public Association of American Universities (AAU) institutions in percentages of women faculty and faculty of color. Rutgers-Newark is routinely ranked byU.S. News and World Reportas one of the most diverse campuses in North America in terms of student composition. Moreover, as the home of Douglass College, the only women’s college in the United States located within a major public research university, one of the top women’s and...

    • 8 Agents of Change: Faculty Leadership in Initiating and Sustaining Diversity at the University of Arizona (pp. 166-183)
      JENI HART, LINDY BRIGHAM, MARY K. GOOD, BARBARA J. MILLS and JANICE MONK

      In the late 1990s, the collective action of several women faculty members in the School of Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) initiated a study that found gender-based disparities in salary, office and laboratory space, awards, resources, committee assignments, named chairs, teaching obligations, and retention. With the support of their dean and president, these women made recommendations aimed at ensuring equity for senior women faculty, improving the professional lives of junior women faculty, and increasing the number of women faculty (Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1999). Their study and MIT’s quick, positive response received wide national attention; other institutions,...

    • 9 Designs for Diversity: The University of Miamiʹs Caribbean Writers Summer Institute and Caribbean Literary Studies (pp. 184-206)
      PATRICIA JOAN SAUNDERS and SANDRA POUCHET PAQUET

      The University of Miami (UM) is the largest, most comprehensive private research university in the southeastern United States; it has a well-earned reputation for academic excellence and cultural diversity. Located in the heart of Miami-Dade County, an area challenged by a myriad of diversity and immigration issues, the university is the temporary home to close to 15,300 undergraduate and graduate students from every state and more than 140 nations. It is also employs more than 9,400 full-time faculty and staff. When you walk across the campus you cannot help but notice the diversity of students who enrich the space. The...

  9. PART FOUR Administration–Faculty Collaborations for Diversity
    • 10 Institutional Contexts for Faculty Leadership in Diversity: A University of California–Santa Barbara Case Study (pp. 209-230)
      JOSEPH CASTRO, SARAH FENSTERMAKER, JOHN MOHR and DEBRA GUCKENHEIMER

      In 1996 voters in California passed Proposition 209, a ballot initiative that disallowed more traditional forms of affirmative action at state-funded universities and colleges. A significant setback for progressives, it marked an initial decline in the diversity of incoming student cohorts (Anderson, 2002; Okong’o, 2006). Even so, the passage of Proposition 209 did not mark the end of affirmative action in California so much as the beginning of an era of programmatic initiatives to achieve greater inclusiveness for women and people of color through alternative means (Pusser, 2004; Douglass, 2007). Using the University of California–Santa Barbara (UCSB) as a...

    • 11 A Ripple Effect: The Influence of a Faculty Womenʹs Caucus on Diversity and Equity at the University of Vermont (pp. 231-248)
      PEG BOYLE SINGLE and DANNIELLE JOY DAVIS

      In 1992, a small group of female faculty members representing fields in the humanities and social sciences sat around a small round table in one of the women’s offices at the University of Vermont (UVM). The latest faculty demographics report had just been circulated. To the surprise of none, the number of both white women faculty members and faculty who were members of minority groups were severely underrepresented. Their discussion centered on what to do about it and how to organize themselves.

      More than a decade later, their actions continue to have an influence on this small public research university...

    • 12 Linking Mobilization to Institutional Power: The Faculty-Led Diversity Initiative at Columbia University (pp. 249-276)
      EMMA FREUDENBERGER, JEAN E. HOWARD, EDDIE JAUREGUI and SUSAN STURM

      In 2004 a diverse group of motivated faculty members conceived an initiative that would yield sustainable, lasting change in the area of diversity at Columbia University. Their work led to the creation of a vice-provostial position dedicated to diversifying the university’s faculty and administration and heralded an unprecedented period of cultural change within the institution. Supported by an initial $15,000,000 commitment, the initiative has stimulated innovation across the College of Arts and Sciences and the university’s professional schools and has mushroomed to involve change agents within the faculty, the student body, and the academic and administrative staff. In this chapter...

  10. AFTERWORD: Faculty as Change Agents Redux–Reflections on My Academic Life (pp. 277-284)
    MARY S. HARTMAN

    When I entered South Side High School in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1955, I wanted to be a stewardess when I grew up. The same was true, I have discovered over the years, of lots of teenage girls of my generation. (This had nothing to do, believe me, with Freudian-tinged fantasies of sex and flying, but everything to do with young women’s shared fantasies of escape in the 1950s.) By the time I entered a small liberal arts college in Pennsylvania four years later, I had changed my mind and decided to become a French teacher. In the middle of...

  11. CONTRIBUTORS (pp. 285-288)
  12. INDEX (pp. 289-298)