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Political Theory and Political Education

Political Theory and Political Education

EDITED BY MELVIN RICHTER
Copyright Date: 1980
Pages: 214
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zv4q7
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    Political Theory and Political Education
    Book Description:

    By presenting alternative conceptions of how to link political theory to practice and education, this volume inaugurates a discussion hitherto not often attempted by modern political philosophers.

    Originally published in 1980.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-5662-6
    Subjects: Political Science
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. v-vi)
  3. NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS (pp. vii-viii)
  4. PREFACE (pp. ix-2)
    Melvin Richter
  5. EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION (pp. 3-56)
    MELVIN RICHTER

    This book is a collection of previously unpublished papers by prominent political theorists working in a number of disciplines and styles. The purpose of the introduction is to make the papers more useful both for readers who may be familiar with one sort of theory and not another, and for those beginning work in political theory and its history. The introduction therefore presupposes little more than a general interest in these subjects. Although the contributors have had the opportunity to comment on the introduction, responsibility for it belongs to the editor alone.

    This introduction will survey some of the changes...

  6. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY AND THE ANALYTICAL TRADITION (pp. 57-75)
    BERNARD WILLIAMS

    There was a time, not very long ago, when analytical philosophy had more or less given up on political philosophy. The introductions to successive volumes ofPolitics, Philosophy and Societyexpressed anxiety about whether the subject could continue to exist, or amazement that it still did; at least one international symposium had as its title “La philosophic politique, existe-t-elle?” and many others had the same theme. There is no need to stress that that time is now past. I do not intend to spend time myself worrying exactly what philosophy is analytical, nor in encouraging discussion on that unrewarding topic,...

  7. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (pp. 76-93)
    CHARLES TAYLOR

    In what way is the philosophy of science relevant in the training of political philosophers? Or, if this sounds grandiose, of people who take courses in political theory in order better to understand and judge the political reality around them?

    The aim of this training should be to make accessible to students a number of different languages through which political things can be described and assessed; and this means both making them more aware of the terms underlying their present unreflecting judgments and descriptions, making them thus more articulate, but also making them bi- and trilingual, so that they can...

  8. MARXISM AS A POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (pp. 94-112)
    MIHAILO MARKOVIĆ

    It seems paradoxical that Marxism, which is more political than any other trend of contemporary philosophy, never systematically developed its political philosophy.

    It is more political in two important senses: As a theory of revolution, it directly challenges the existing political structure of the capitalist world; where it is an official ideology of the bureaucratic élite, it is used as the justification of the existing political system.

    There are several reasons why it was never systematically developed.

    Marx himself resisted systematic development of philosophy. In his opinion, philosophy pure and speculative, isolated from concrete scientific inquiry, divorced from practice was...

  9. THE STUDY OF TEXTS (pp. 113-138)
    ALLAN BLOOM

    Our general theme is “How ought the next generation of political philosophers to be educated?” I suppose what is meant is really “How ought the next generation of professors of political philosophy to be educated?” We cannot prescribe to genius; and it can, for the most part, take care of itself. Philosophy is not a profession like medicine or shoemaking. Professors of political philosophy can, however, be trained, and their function is to take advantage of genius and to help to make it accessible to others. They can also help the philosophers by preserving in the form of a tradition...

  10. POLITICAL IDEAS AS HISTORICAL EVENTS: POLITICAL PHILOSOPHERS AS HISTORICAL ACTORS (pp. 139-158)
    J.G.A. POCOCK

    Speaking as a historian who regularly returns of his own free will to that strange series of caves inhabited by political philosophers and illuminated by not a few totally artificial suns, I am peculiarly conscious how easily one can be taken to say not only what one did not intend to say, but what one specifically and explicitly declared one’s intention not to say. Let me start by recalling that First Law of interdisciplinary communication which runs: “Nearly all methodological debate is useless, because nearly all methodological debate is reducible to the formula: You should not be doing your job;...

  11. POLITICAL DECISION-MAKING AND POLITICAL EDUCATION (pp. 159-176)
    MICHAEL WALZER

    In a democratic state, every citizen has political decisions to make. I don’t mean only the decision to vote or not to vote, to support the Democrats or Republicans, to attend this meeting or sign that petition. There is a deeper level of deciding that I want to talk about, which has to do with the relation of the people to their political leaders. It is a special feature of democratic government that the experiences of leaders are not alien to ordinary citizens. There is no social distance; there are no mysteries of state. With only a modest imaginative effort,...

  12. POLITICAL THEORY AND LEGAL EDUCATION (pp. 177-189)
    RONALD DWORKIN

    I want to discuss a practical problem.¹ How can we improve interdisciplinary connections between political theory and political philosophy on the one hand, and legal education within traditional law schools on the other hand? The present situation is this. For a very long time—certainly going back to the 1930s, and in the case of Yale Law School, even behind that—it has been accepted by everyone that there ought to be much more use of social science, humanities, and philosophy in strict legal education. Every law school I am aware of has made some effort to bring this about....

  13. POLITICAL THEORY AND POLITICAL COMMENTARY (pp. 190-203)
    SHELDON WOLIN

    The problems addressed in this paper are two: the interrelations between political theory and political commentary and their differences. The approach to these problems will be to consider political theory and political commentary as definite, even highly stylized, modes of activity. Both are concerned with the interpretation of politics and both engage in interpretation in a political way. Theory and commentary, it will be contended, are not only about politics; they are politics expressed through the act of interpretation. The paper, then, is about the politics of interpretation.

    In exploring the subject I shall be using a severe conception of...

  14. Back Matter (pp. 204-204)