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Philip II and Macedonian Imperialism

Philip II and Macedonian Imperialism

JOHN R. ELLIS
Copyright Date: 1976
Pages: 312
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zvd8j
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    Philip II and Macedonian Imperialism
    Book Description:

    This book is a study in depth of the rise to power of Macedonia under the astute leadership of Philip II, whose diplomatic adroitness and military skill paved the way for the career of his son and heir, Alexander the Great. J. R. Ellis has attempted to arrive at an impartial assessment of the process by which Philip brought Macedonia from the periphery to the hub of Balkan and Aegean affairs.

    Originally published in 1986.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-5841-5
    Subjects: History
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. 5-5)
  3. PREFACE (pp. 6-13)
    J.R.E.
  4. THE CHRONOLOGY OF PHILIP’S REIGN (pp. 14-20)
  5. CHAPTER I MACEDONIA: PEOPLE, LANDSCAPE AND TRADITION (pp. 21-44)

    One is hard pressed to comprehend the lasting forces that shaped the character of the ancient Greek and his polis without a firm appreciation of the geographical and topographical features of his peninsula, features that more perhaps than anything else have borne the responsibility for the comparative continuity of Hellenic society through the ages in the face of immigrations, occupations, political dismemberment and arbitrary reconstruction. But not much less fundamental to the historical processes played out upon this peninsula are the very different characteristics of the southern Balkan region, whence it protrudes into the Mediterranean basin. If the predominating feature...

  6. CHAPTER II 359—357 THE ATHENIAN ALIGNMENT (pp. 45-65)

    The defeat of perdikkas by the forces of the Dardanian Bardylis could hardly have dashed more abruptly the Macedonian optimism that had provoked the clash.¹ Four thousand Macedonians lay dead with their young king. Depression lay heavy over the country, for not only was the external threat to Macedonia more immediately serious than for at least three decades, but the dead ruler’s natural heir, his son Amyntas, was no more than a child. Enemies of throne and state on all sides gathered themselves to pounce. Paionian tribes in the north, never so well organized as to present a real threat...

  7. CHAPTER III 357—351 THE CHALKIDIAN ALIGNMENT (pp. 66-89)

    Amphipolis fell by storm. After a series of assaults a section of the wall was breached and the Macedonians pressed through the gap amidst fierce fighting, during which many defenders were killed, until the last resistance subsided. This victory, with siege-machinery playing a significant role in its achievement,¹ marks the beginning of a long and successful Macedonian tradition; with the increasing sophistication of siege-equipment it became no longer exceptional that walled cities fell by direct assault.

    Shortly afterwards the Amphipolitandemosissued a decree proclaiming the banishment and outlawry of Stratokles and Philon.² Ephoros, in a reference to the exile...

  8. CHAPTER IV 351—346 TOWARDS A GREEK SETTLEMENT (pp. 90-124)

    Believing that he had settled the Chalkidian problem, at least for the time being, Philip turned to the reconstruction necessary on and beyond his northwestern and western frontiers. Some indications have already been noted that repercussions of the Macedonian setback of 353 had been felt in these areas also, and it is probably now, after his campaigns in the east and south of the kingdom, that Philip began to attend to difficulties with Ulyrian and Paionian tribes and with King Arybbas of Epeiros. Of a Paionian campaign we know no detail, but it may be the action that led Isokrates...

  9. CHAPTER V 346—342 THE UNEASY PEACE (pp. 125-159)

    It has been observed in a recent discussion of the Peace of Philokrates¹ that the role of Demosthenes as ‘the real patron of the peace’ would justify our regarding it more properly as ‘The Peace of Demosthenes’; his procedural motions of early Elaphebolion, his solicitous treatment of the visiting Macedonian ambassadors and his successful piloting of Philokrates’ motion through the assembly on the 18th and 19th of the same month were vital to the architecture of the peace. But, as we have seen, the terms approved during Elaphebolion - and, we may include, thede factoreinstatement of the exclusion...

  10. CHAPTER VI 342—340 BREAKDOWN (pp. 160-180)

    As we have had cause το notice,¹ it is likely that since 348/7 Philip had been in contact with the Atarnian ruler Hermias, whose small principality on the Aiolian coast of Asia Minor, opposite Mytilene, offered an ideal advance-post in the planned, but now delayed, Asian campaign. The go-between in this arrangement appears to have been Aristotle and it is quite likely that he had negotiated an actual alliance, necessarily in secret. Hermias’ position, always somewhat slippery in the longer prospect, had become far more precarious after Artaxerxes Ochos’ successful re-conquests of Phoenicia, Cyprus and Egypt.² There was of course...

  11. CHAPTER VII 340—337 THE SECOND GREEK SETTLEMENT (pp. 181-210)

    The siege of Byzantion, which in the event turned out for Philip no better than the assault on Perinthos, was nevertheless an event of some significance. So far as we can tell, the Persian assistance of the earlier campaign was not repeated.¹ Artaxerxes Ochos, whose sympathies had been at the very best lukewarm, now decided that after the loss of her corn-fleet Athens would be obliged to involve herself openly in hindering Philip’s activities; Persia could accordingly withdraw and allow the Greek powers to do to each other what injuries they might. The Macedonian mountain, constructed by Greek intelligence over...

  12. CHAPTER VIII 337—336 PHILIP, ALEXANDER AND PERSIA (pp. 211-234)

    Arriving home after an absence of nearly a year and a half,¹ Philip gave orders for the preparations necessary to begin the Asian offensive in the following spring.² He had most of a year in which to settle any difficulties attendant upon the impending absence of himself and a large Macedonian army for a campaign that might well prove difficult, dangerous and protracted. But beyond problems of logistics, which subordinates could handle, and those of Macedonia’s Illyrian neighbours, to whom he would shortly need to devote his efforts,³ we are compelled to assume that unforeseen pressures bearing on the question...

  13. APPENDIX (pp. 235-239)
  14. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY (pp. 240-244)
  15. NOTES (pp. 245-308)
  16. SELECT INDEX of names and subjects (pp. 309-312)