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Journal Article

Schooling and Labor Market Consequences of School Construction in Indonesia: Evidence from an Unusual Policy Experiment

Esther Duflo
The American Economic Review
Vol. 91, No. 4 (Sep., 2001), pp. 795-813
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2677813
Page Count: 19
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Schooling and Labor Market Consequences of School Construction in Indonesia: Evidence from an Unusual Policy Experiment
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Abstract

Between 1973 and 1978, the Indonesian government engaged in one of the largest school construction programs on record. Combining differences across regions in the number of schools constructed with differences across cohorts induced by the timing of the program suggests that each primary school constructed per 1,000 children led to an average increase of 0.12 to 0.19 years of education, as well as a 1.5 to 2.7 percent increase in wages. This implies estimates of economic returns to education ranging from 6.8 to 10.6 percent.

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