Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

Men, Women, Eunuchs, Etc.: Visualities of Gendered Identities in Kassite Babylonian Seals (ca. 1470–1155 B.C.)

Serdar Yalçın
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
No. 376 (November 2016), pp. 121-150
DOI: 10.5615/bullamerschoorie.376.0121
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5615/bullamerschoorie.376.0121
Page Count: 30

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Kassites, Gender identity, Men, Sumer, Masculinity, Cylinders, Women, Art museums, Gender roles, Seals
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Men, Women, Eunuchs, Etc.: Visualities of Gendered Identities in Kassite Babylonian Seals (ca. 1470–1155 B.C.)
Preview not available

Abstract

Scholars have extensively investigated ancient Mesopotamian cylinder seals in terms of their iconographic and stylistic qualities. This article concentrates on the question of whether and how gender, as an important component of personal identity, found expression in the material, visual, and textual aspects of Babylonian cylinder seals of the Kassite period, a relatively understudied era of Mesopotamian history. Like any other society, ancient Mesopotamia had various complex gender categories, which included, in addition to normative male and female groups, other genders, such as eunuchs and homosexuals. It is argued here that the gender of a seal owner and the nature of the relations between different genders in Kassite-era Babylonian society were communicated through the seal image and labels, as well as through the use of cylinder stones.

Page Thumbnails