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Peer Influences on Sex-Role Development in Preschoolers

Michael E. Lamb and Jaipaul L. Roopnarine
Child Development
Vol. 50, No. 4 (Dec., 1979), pp. 1219-1222
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129353
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129353
Page Count: 4
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Peer Influences on Sex-Role Development in Preschoolers
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Abstract

The occurrence of sex-stereotyped activities and peer responses to them were systematically observed in a naturalistic setting. Sex-appropriate and sex-inappropriate instances of all target activities occurred, as did instances of both potentially reinforcing and potentially punishing responses. Reinforcement occurred more frequently than did punishment and it was usually administered appropriately. Boys were more likely to administer reinforcements than girls were. Positively reinforced activities continued longer than punished activities did. Positive reinforcement for male-typed activities affected boys more than girls; positive reinforcement for female-typed activities affected girls more than boys.

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