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The Texas Adoption Project: Adopted Children and Their Intellectual Resemblance to Biological and Adoptive Parents

Joseph M. Horn
Child Development
Vol. 54, No. 2 (Apr., 1983), pp. 268-275
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129690
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129690
Page Count: 8
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The Texas Adoption Project: Adopted Children and Their Intellectual Resemblance to Biological and Adoptive Parents
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Abstract

Intelligence test scores were obtained from parents and children in 300 adoptive families and compared with similar measures available for the biological mothers of the same adopted children. Results supported the hypothesis that genetic variability is an important influence in the development of individual differences for intelligence. The most salient finding was that adopted children resemble their biological mothers more than they resemble the adoptive parents who reared them from birth. A small subset of the oldest adopted children did not resemble their biological mothers. The suggestion that the influence of genes declines with age is treated with caution since other adoption studies report a trend in the opposite direction.

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