Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Culture Contact and Culture Change: The Korean Peninsula and Its Relations with the Han Dynasty Commandery of Lelang

Hyung II Pai
World Archaeology
Vol. 23, No. 3, Archaeology of Empires (Feb., 1992), pp. 306-319
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/124765
Page Count: 14
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
Culture Contact and Culture Change: The Korean Peninsula and Its Relations with the Han Dynasty Commandery of Lelang
Preview not available

Abstract

The most controversial topic in Korean archaeology and history today concerns the Han Lelang commanderies that were established in the Korean peninsula during the Han dynasty in 108 BC and lasted for 400 years. Despite the many archaeological, historical, and inscriptional evidences to the contrary, North Korean archaeologists and the South Korean historian Yun Nae-hyon continue to deny the existence of the commandery Lelang in the Korean peninsula. This work adopts a different approach from previous Japanese or Korean scholarship on Lelang studies by focusing on issues of acculturation and culture change. The analysis rests mainly on archaeological evidence, in addition to the earliest ethnohistoric data which date to the third century AD.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[306]
    [306]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
307
    307
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308
  • Thumbnail: Page 
309
    309
  • Thumbnail: Page 
310
    310
  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315
  • Thumbnail: Page 
316
    316
  • Thumbnail: Page 
317
    317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
319
    319