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Mammals of the Lyallpur Region, West Pakistan

Richard D. Taber, Ahmad Nadeem Sheri and Mustafa Saeed Ahmad
Journal of Mammalogy
Vol. 48, No. 3 (Aug., 1967), pp. 392-407
DOI: 10.2307/1377772
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1377772
Page Count: 16
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Abstract

A seven-month (October-April) survey was made of the mammals in that region of the Indus Valley around Lyallpur, West Pakistan. Evidence concerning 42 species was obtained and 260 individuals of 26 species collected. The results include data on reproduction, abundance, and ecology, organized into species accounts, and a discussion of the faunal changes which have resulted from the introduction of irrigation over the last century. Irrigated agricultural land has largely replaced the tropical thorn scrub. Cropland, human habitations, plantation forests, marshes, relict areas of thorn scrub, and the eastern edge of the extensive Thal Desert were studied as mammalian habitats. Species thought to have been eliminated from this region, by direct reduction or habitat change over the last century or more, include: caracal, tiger, lion, cheetah, hog deer, and Gangetic dolphin. Species much reduced in number include: wolf, Bengal fox, striped hyaena, desert cat, fishing cat, nilgai, blackbuck, chinkara, Wagner's gerbil, Indian hairy-footed gerbil, and desert gerbil. Species encouraged by recent ecological changes include: house shrew, Asiatic jackal, jungle cat, wild boar, northern palm squirrel, house rat, house mouse, short-tailed bandicoot-rat, and Indian gerbil.

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