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Emile Durkheim's Theory of Integration in Differentiated Social Systems

Jonathan H. Turner
The Pacific Sociological Review
Vol. 24, No. 4 (Oct., 1981), pp. 379-391
DOI: 10.2307/1388774
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1388774
Page Count: 13
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Emile Durkheim's Theory of Integration in Differentiated Social Systems
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Abstract

An examination of Emile Durkheim as a theorist is undertaken, with an emphasis on his formulation of abstract theoretical principles. Operating from the assumption that Durkheim formulated some of sociology's basic laws of human organization, his abstract principles are summarized with respect to system differentiation, system integration, and system disintegration. Most of these principles are seen to come from Durkheim's "The Division of Labor in Society" and "Suicide". Other works, while intellectually important, are not viewed as theoretically significant as these.

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