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A Revision of the Filefish Genera Amanses and Cantherhines

John E. Randall
Copeia
Vol. 1964, No. 2 (Jun. 30, 1964), pp. 331-361
DOI: 10.2307/1441027
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1441027
Page Count: 31
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A Revision of the Filefish Genera Amanses and Cantherhines
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Abstract

The tropical and subtropical filefish genera Amanses and Cantherhines are reviewed. Amanses, with the single Indo-Western Pacific species scopas, is distinguished from Cantherhines by the prominent spines on the body between the soft dorsal and anal fins; deep caudal peduncle; distinct, coarsely spinous scales; and low dorsal and anal fin-ray counts. Both genera are separable from other monacanthids principally in the location of the first dorsal spine over or in front of the middle of the eye; a deep median groove in the back into which the first dorsal spine folds; the lack of large spinules on the first dorsal spine; immobile pelvic terminus; and well-developed ventral flap. Related genera may share one or more of these characters with Amanses and Cantherhines. Eleven species of Cantherhines are recognized: longipinnis (endemic to Lord Howe Island); the Indo-Pacific dumerili (carolae and howensis are synonyms); macrocerus from the tropical western Atlantic Ocean (a large species long confused with pullus); multilineatus from Japan; fronticinctus from East Africa and the Indo-Malayan region; verecundus from Hawaii; tiki, a new species described from one specimen from Easter Island (unique in its produced snout and short first dorsal spine); melanoides from Queensland, Australia; sandwichiensis, a second Hawaiian endemic; the Indo-Western Pacific pardalis (a common species with 11 synonyms); and pullus, abundant on tropical Atlantic reefs. The last three species are closely related; all have 2 prominent white spots on the body, I at the posterior base of the soft dorsal fin and a small one at the posterior base of the anal fin.

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