Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Multiplying the Problems of Intelligence by Eight: A Critique of Gardner's Theory

Perry D. Klein
Canadian Journal of Education / Revue canadienne de l'éducation
Vol. 22, No. 4 (Autumn, 1997), pp. 377-394
DOI: 10.2307/1585790
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1585790
Page Count: 18
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Multiplying the Problems of Intelligence by Eight: A Critique of Gardner's Theory
Preview not available

Abstract

Howard Gardner has theorized that the mind comprises seven (or eight) intelligences. Multiple intelligence theory has inspired educational innovations across North America, but has received little critical analysis. I contend that Gardner is on the horns of a dilemma. A "weak" version of multiple intelligence theory would be uninteresting, whereas a "strong" version is not adequately supported by the evidence Gardner presents. Pedagogically, multiple intelligence theory has inspired diverse practices, including balanced programming, matching instruction to learning styles, and student specialization. However, the theory shares the limitations of general intelligence theory: it is too broad to be useful for planning curriculum, and as a theory of ability, it presents a static view of student competence. Research on the knowledge and strategies that learners use in specific activities, and on how they construct this knowledge, may prove more relevant to classroom practice. /// D'après la théorie de Howard Gardner, on trouve sept (ou huit) types d'intelligence dans l'esprit humain. Cette théorie a inspiré diverses innovations pédagogiques à travers l'Amérique du Nord, mais a fait l'objet de peu d'analyse critique. L'auteur soutient que Gardner est pris dans un dilemme. Une version "allégée" de la théorie des intelligences multiples ne serait pas intéressante tandis qu'une version "enrichie" de cette théorie n'est pas adéquatement corroborée par Gardner. En pédagogie, la théorie des intelligences multiples a inspiré diverses méthodes, dont le programme coordonné, l'appariement de l'enseignement aux styles d'apprentissage et la spécialisation des élèves. Toutefois, cette théorie offre les mêmes limites que la théorie de l'intelligence générale: elle est trop vaste pour être utile lors de la planification de programmes d'études et, en tant que théorie de l'aptitude, elle présente une vue statique des compétences de l'élèves. Des études portant sur les connaissances et les stratégies dont se servent les apprenants dans des activités précises et sur la manière dont ils développent ces connaissances pourraient s'avérer plus pertinentes pour les méthodes pédagogiques.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377
  • Thumbnail: Page 
378
    378
  • Thumbnail: Page 
379
    379
  • Thumbnail: Page 
380
    380
  • Thumbnail: Page 
381
    381
  • Thumbnail: Page 
382
    382
  • Thumbnail: Page 
383
    383
  • Thumbnail: Page 
384
    384
  • Thumbnail: Page 
385
    385
  • Thumbnail: Page 
386
    386
  • Thumbnail: Page 
387
    387
  • Thumbnail: Page 
388
    388
  • Thumbnail: Page 
389
    389
  • Thumbnail: Page 
390
    390
  • Thumbnail: Page 
391
    391
  • Thumbnail: Page 
392
    392
  • Thumbnail: Page 
393
    393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
394
    394