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On Seeing Reddish Green and Yellowish Blue

Hewitt D. Crane and Thomas P. Piantanida
Science
New Series, Vol. 221, No. 4615 (Sep. 9, 1983), pp. 1078-1080
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1691544
Page Count: 3
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On Seeing Reddish Green and Yellowish Blue
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Abstract

Four color names--red, yellow, green, and blue--can be used singly or combined in pairs to describe all other colors. Orange, for example, can be described as a reddish yellow, cyan as a bluish green, and purple as a reddish blue. Some dyadic color names (such as reddish green and bluish yellow) describe colors that are not normally realizable. By stabilizing the retinal image of the boundary between a pair of red and green stripes (or a pair of yellow and blue stripes) but not their outer edges, however, the entire region can be perceived simultaneously as both red and green (or yellow and blue).

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