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Morphological Changes in Swine Associated with Environmental Temperature

Morris E. Weaver and Douglas L. Ingram
Ecology
Vol. 50, No. 4 (Jul., 1969), pp. 710-713
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/1936264
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1936264
Page Count: 4
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Morphological Changes in Swine Associated with Environmental Temperature
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Abstract

Ten animals from two litters of English large white pigs were weaned at 12-15 days of age and placed one per cage within constant-temperature rooms. In the first group, a comparison was made between three animals raised at 5⚬C and their littermates raised at 35⚬C. There were marked differences in appearance and in gross morphology. Those from the cold environment had more hair, were shorter and more stocky, and had a shorter tail and smaller ears than their littermates. A second group of animals were raised at 20⚬C and 35⚬C; it was found that with respect to all measurements the 20⚬C pigs were intermediate between the 5⚬ and 35⚬C animals. These observations accord with Bergmann's Rule that animals raised in colder environments are characterized by a reduced surface area/body weight ratio. The results likewise substantiate Allen's Rule that in colder climates the length of appendages and of extremities is reduced.

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