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Characterization of a New in vitro Model for Studies of Reepithelialization in Human Partial Thickness Wounds

Katarina Jansson, Gunnar Kratz and Anders Haegerstrand
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Animal
Vol. 32, No. 9 (Oct., 1996), pp. 534-540
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20172259
Page Count: 7
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Characterization of a New in vitro Model for Studies of Reepithelialization in Human Partial Thickness Wounds
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Abstract

Reepithelialization of artificial partial thickness wounds made in biopsies of human skin was determined after 3, 5, or 7 d of incubation, submerged or elevated to the air-liquid interface. The biopsies were reepithelialized within 5-7 d, with a more complete epidermal healing in wounds exposed to air. Both types of wounds showed similar time-course in deposition of basement membrane components, as detected by immunofluorescence labeling. Laminin and collagen type VII were deposited underneath the migrating tips, whereas collagen type IV was detected after reepithelialization. Markers of terminal differentiation showed a pattern close to normal in the air-liquid incubated wounds after reepithelialization. Involucrin was detected in the suprabasal regions of the migrating epidermis and thereafter in the upper half of neo-epidermis in the air-liquid incubated wound. Filaggrin could not be detected in the submerged wounds at any time during healing, whereas wounds exposed to air showed a well-differentiated epidermis by Day 7. Tritiated thymidine-incorporation indicated proliferation of epidermal and dermal cells during reepithelialization and a maintained viability, as shown by cultivation of endothelial- and fibroblast-like cells obtained from the dermis 7 d after wounding. Reepithelialization in this human in vitro model is supported by a matrix close to normal with the possibility of extracellular influences and cell-cell interactions and, in addition, the technique is simple and reproducible. Therefore, we suggest this model for studies of regeneration in culture and as a complement to in vivo studies on epidermal healing.

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