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Journal Article

Race, Cultural Capital, and Schooling: An Analysis of Trends in the United States

Matthijs Kalmijn and Gerbert Kraaykamp
Sociology of Education
Vol. 69, No. 1 (Jan., 1996), pp. 22-34
DOI: 10.2307/2112721
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112721
Page Count: 13
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Race, Cultural Capital, and Schooling: An Analysis of Trends in the United States
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Abstract

Using survey data on Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites in 1982 and 1985, the authors examine the link between racial inequality in schooling and differences in cultural capital--the degree to which parents socialize their children into high-status culture. The findings indicate a significant increase in parental cultural capital across birth cohorts (from 1900 to 1960). That this increase has been faster among Blacks than among Whites and persists after Black-White differences are taken into account suggests a degree of racial integration in the cultural domain. The results also show that exposure to high-status culture is associated with higher levels of schooling and that the integration of Blacks into high-status culture has contributed to the Black-White convergence in schooling. The latter finding illustrates that cultural capital may serve as a route to upward mobility for less privileged minority groups.

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