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The Efficiency of Southern Tenant Plantations, 1900-1945

Nancy Virts
The Journal of Economic History
Vol. 51, No. 2 (Jun., 1991), pp. 385-395
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2122582
Page Count: 11
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The Efficiency of Southern Tenant Plantations, 1900-1945
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Abstract

The continued importance of tenant plantations in some areas of the South since the Civil War suggests that there was some advantage to large-scale agriculture. One source of economies of scale was in the marketing of high-quality cotton.

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