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Modern Urban Parks

Terence Young
Geographical Review
Vol. 85, No. 4, Thematic Issue: American Urban Geography (Oct., 1995), pp. 535-551
DOI: 10.2307/215924
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/215924
Page Count: 17
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Modern Urban Parks
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Abstract

Urban parks were once thought to be representations of nature that would promote a better society. Like cities, these parks were subject to modernization: sections of them became segments dedicated to specialized uses. These social-spatial changes are linked to a changing concept of how parks contribute to the improvement of society. Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, where such changes began during the 1880s, is examined as a case study, but the generalizations apply to most large parks in the central cities of American metropolitan areas. Examples of changes are ornamental plant species, play areas for children, and athletics for adolescents and adults.

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