If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Ecological Studies of Lianas in Lambir National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia

Francis E. Putz and Paul Chai
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 75, No. 2 (Jun., 1987), pp. 523-531
DOI: 10.2307/2260431
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/2260431
Page Count: 9
Were these topics helpful?

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ecological Studies of Lianas in Lambir National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Liana (climber or woody vine) abundance and climbing habitats were studied in primary dipterocarp forest in Lambir National Park, Sarawak. (2) Sample plots of 0.1 ha were established on the upper slopes of a broad ridge at altitudes of about 100-140 m and in an adjacent valley at an altitude of approximately 50 m. Five plots were selected at random in each area. The diameters of all lianas > 1 cm dbh and trees > 10 cm dbh were measured and the proportion of trees infested with lianas was recorded. In a 0.04 ha area in each plot we identified all lianas > 1 cm dbh, recorded on which trees the lianas were growing, and noted how the lianas attached to their host trees. Vines < 1 cm dbh and trees < 10 cm dbh were counted in a 0.01 ha subplot in each 0.1 ha plot. (3) There were averages of 348 and 164 woody lianas of dbh > 2 cm ha-1 in the valley and on the hilltop, respectively. Upright (self-supporting) liana seedlings were also approximately twice as abundant in the valley. (4) A total of seventy-nine woody liana species representing twenty-four familes were recorded, with thirty-nine species in the ridge plots and fifty-three species in the valley plots. Only fourteen species were common to both areas. (5) Approximately half of the trees > 20 cm dbh were liana-infested in both the valley and hilltop plots. Trees supporting more than one liana were more numerous in the valley. The average canopy liana connected the crowns of 1.4 trees > 20 cm dbh in both areas. (6) The influences of soil fertility and frequency of forest disturbance on the abundance of lianas are discussed with reference to data from other tropical forests.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
523
    523
  • Thumbnail: Page 
524
    524
  • Thumbnail: Page 
525
    525
  • Thumbnail: Page 
526
    526
  • Thumbnail: Page 
527
    527
  • Thumbnail: Page 
528
    528
  • Thumbnail: Page 
529
    529
  • Thumbnail: Page 
530
    530
  • Thumbnail: Page 
531
    531