If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Short-Term Evolution of Reduced Dispersal in Island Plant Populations

Martin L. Cody and Jacob McC. Overton
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 84, No. 1 (Feb., 1996), pp. 53-61
DOI: 10.2307/2261699
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2261699
Page Count: 9
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Short-Term Evolution of Reduced Dispersal in Island Plant Populations
Preview not available

Abstract

1 Dramatic reductions in dispersal potential are characteristic of many diverse taxa, both plants and animals, on oceanic islands. This paper documents the same trend of reduced dispersal ability over the course of just a few generations in some weedy, short-lived and wind-dispersed plants of inshore islands in British Columbia, Canada. 2 We measured dispersal-related morphological characteristics of diaspores from island populations of known ages, and from mainland populations. In two of three species with sufficiently large sample sizes, older island populations show increasingly reduced dispersal potential relative to mainland populations or to young island populations. 3 These and other morphological differences are consistent with results expected from strong selection for reduced dispersal potential, and may be striking examples of short-term evolution in small and isolated natural populations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61