Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Rhymes, Nursery Rhymes, and Reading in Early Childhood

Morag Maclean, Peter Bryant and Lynette Bradley
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly
Vol. 33, No. 3, Invitational Issue: Children's Reading and the Development of Phonological Awareness (July 1987), pp. 255-281
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23086536
Page Count: 27
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Rhymes, Nursery Rhymes, and Reading in Early Childhood
Preview not available

Abstract

Little is known about the origins of phonological awareness. But one theory is that young children learn to analyze the component sounds in words with the help of common linguistic routines. Rhymes, and particularly nursery rhymes, are a possible example. Words rhyme because they share component sounds: To recognize that two words rhyme is, therefore, to know something about their component sounds. This theory was investigated in a 15-month longitudinal study which began when the children were age 3 years, 4 months. Assessments were made of their knowledge of nursery rhymes and their phonological skills, particularly the detection and production of rhyme and alliteration. Parental social class and educational levels were also assessed. A strong, highly specific relationship was found between knowledge of nursery rhymes and the development of phonological skills, which remained significant when differences in IQ and social background were controlled. Measures of nursery rhymes and of the detection and production of rhyme and alliteration were related to early reading, but not to early arithmetic skills.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
255
    255
  • Thumbnail: Page 
256
    256
  • Thumbnail: Page 
257
    257
  • Thumbnail: Page 
258
    258
  • Thumbnail: Page 
259
    259
  • Thumbnail: Page 
260
    260
  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[264]
    [264]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[268]
    [268]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
277
    277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
278
    278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281