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Journal Article

Helmet legislation and admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries in Canadian provinces and territories: interrupted time series analysis

Jessica Dennis, Tim Ramsay, Alexis F Turgeon and Ryan Zarychanski
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 346, No. 7912 (15 June 2013), p. 15
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/23494880
Page Count: 1
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Abstract

STUDY QUESTION I s provincial bicycle helmet legislation associated with a reduction in the rate of admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries among young people and adults in Canada? SUMMARY ANSWER Reductions in the rates of hospital admissions for cycling related head injuries were greater in provinces with helmet legislation, but injury rates were already decreasing before the implementation of legislation, and the rate of decline was not appreciably altered by legislation. In the context of Canada's existing safety campaigns, improvements to the cycling infrastructure, and the passive uptake of helmets the incremental contribution of provincial helmet legislation to reduce hospital admissions for cycling related head injuries seems to have been minimal. WHAT IS KNOWN AND WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS Published controlled before and after studies among young people suggest a protective effect of helmet legislation on cycling related head injuries. Most of these studies, however, did not account for existing trends in cycling related injury rates, nor did they investigate the association between helmet legislation and head injuries in adults. Our analyses included both young people and adults and we explicitly modeled baseline trends in the rate of cycling related head injuries.

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