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Movements of Cave Bats in Southeastern Brazil, with Emphasis on the Population Ecology of the Common Vampire Bat, Desmodus rotundus (Chiroptera)

Eleonora Trajano
Biotropica
Vol. 28, No. 1 (Mar., 1996), pp. 121-129
DOI: 10.2307/2388777
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388777
Page Count: 9
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Movements of Cave Bats in Southeastern Brazil, with Emphasis on the Population Ecology of the Common Vampire Bat, Desmodus rotundus (Chiroptera)
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Abstract

A mark-recapture study of cave bats was carried out in the Alto Vale do rio Ribeira, SE Brazil. The size of the colonies varied monthly, indicating the occurrence of frequent movements among caves and a low degree of roost fidelity for the commonest species: Desmodus rotundus, Carollia perspicillata. Anoura caudifer, Artibeus fimbriatus. Phyllostomines (Trachops cirrhosus, Chrotopterus auritus) and Peropteryx macrotis seem more sedentary, as suggested by their higher recapture rates. D. rotundus uses multiple roosts, mostly within relatively small areas, with a 2-3 km radius. These vampires move preferentially along valleys, males moving more than females. Frequency of movements is probably related to the availability of roosts and climate. The climate of the Alto Ribeira is subtropical, with cool nights during the "dry" season, when part of the vampire population (and other species as well) would migrate to warmer regions. Recapture rates and the estimated individual ranges are similar to those observed for this species in other regions. The minimum population density of D. rotundus varied monthly from one to 3.5 individuals per km2 Diphylla ecaudata moves more frequently and probably has larger individual ranges than D. rotundus, possibly due to its higher feeding specialization.

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