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Factors Influencing Subject-Observer Interaction in an Organizational Study

Allan Schwartzbaum and Leopold Gruenfeld
Administrative Science Quarterly
Vol. 14, No. 3 (Sep., 1969), pp. 443-450
DOI: 10.2307/2391140
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2391140
Page Count: 8
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Factors Influencing Subject-Observer Interaction in an Organizational Study
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Abstract

This study, based on observations and questionnaire responses, examines some factors influencing the extent of interaction initiated by supervisors with observers who discouraged such interaction. The findings suggest that the timing, the content, and the extent of subject-observer interaction may be a useful measure for distinguishing those supervisors who are well integrated into the organization from those supervisors who are tense and anxious about their work. Defensive, protective, and exploitative orientations were presented as possible motives for initiating subject-observer interaction. The results also point to potential biases in the research process stemming from the observer's increasing awareness of differing characteristics among the subjects.

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