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Non-Allopatric Speciation in Animals

Douglas J. Futuyma and Gregory C. Mayer
Systematic Zoology
Vol. 29, No. 3 (Sep., 1980), pp. 254-271
DOI: 10.2307/2412661
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2412661
Page Count: 18
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Non-Allopatric Speciation in Animals
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Abstract

Major recent challenges to the view that animal speciation is usually allopatric are reviewed, and are found unconvincing, either because of their theoretical implausibility or because of insufficient evidence. Special attention is given to the theory of stasipatric speciation, and to purported cases, especially in tephritid fruit flies, of sympatric speciation associated with a shift to a new host. Stasipatric speciation is unlikely under population genetic theory; moreover, chromosome rearrangements probably seldom facilitate speciation. In the tephritid genus Rhagoletis, the archetypal case of sympatric speciation, there is little or no evidence of genetic divergence or of sympatric speciation. The conditions under which host-associated sympatric speciation might occur are so exacting as to be met by very few species.

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