If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

A Numerical Taxonomic Analysis of Cannabis with Special Reference to Species Delimitation

Ernest Small, Perry Y. Jui and L. P. Lefkovitch
Systematic Botany
Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring, 1976), pp. 67-84
DOI: 10.2307/2418840
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2418840
Page Count: 18
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
A Numerical Taxonomic Analysis of Cannabis with Special Reference to Species Delimitation
Preview not available

Abstract

Two thousand five hundred plants, representing 232 diverse populations of Cannabis, were grown under standard conditions in a garden, scored for 47 attributes, and the data used in a numerical taxonomic study of variation. Groups of interest included "nonintoxicant" and "semi-intoxicant" populations (collectively referable to C. sativa), "intoxicant" populations (sometimes called C. indica), fiber and oil cultivars (referable to C. sativa), "wild" populations (sometimes called C. ruderalis), and plants either containing or not containing cannabigerol monomethyl ether. Clustering methodology revealed only a limited tendency for the populations to separate into the above groupings. However, canonical analysis (equally weighted multiple discriminant analysis) of morphological characteristics only proved highly successful in delineating the groups. The analysis resulting from the comparison of wild and cultivated populations when applied to a large sample of populations failed to suggest two discrete groupings, and it is consequently concluded that wild and cultivated populations intergrade so greatly as to preclude recognition of wild plants as a separate species (the so-called C. ruderalis). Those morphological characteristics that successfully distinguish intoxicant populations from other populations in material raised under standardized garden conditions were sufficiently variable to suggest that the intoxicant potential of plants collected in nature cannot be reliably distinguished by morphology; consequently it is judged that there are no grounds for distinguishing intoxicant plants (the so-called C. indica) as a separate species. It is concluded that all plants of Cannabis are assignable to one species, C. sativa.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[67]
    [67]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84