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Adaptation Unto Death: Function of Fear Screams

Goran Hogstedt
The American Naturalist
Vol. 121, No. 4 (Apr., 1983), pp. 562-570
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2460982
Page Count: 9
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Adaptation Unto Death: Function of Fear Screams
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Abstract

A high frequency of rapid predator approach to broadcast fear screams supports the predator attraction hypothesis in explaining the function of screaming. A high incidence of screaming in prey species that are relatively large in relation to their main predators and live in densely vegetated habitats is concordant with this view. Contrary to earlier reports, I therefore conclude that fear screaming is a nonaltruistic phenomenon and that it is not maintained through kin selection.

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