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Statistics in Preschool

Sterling C. Hilton, Scott D. Grimshaw and Genan T. Anderson
The American Statistician
Vol. 55, No. 4 (Nov., 2001), pp. 332-336
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2685697
Page Count: 5
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Statistics in Preschool
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Abstract

Statistics education has become established in the elementary school curriculum. Because the principles of statistics underlie many basic learning concepts, it is not surprising to discover statistics principles in the preschool curriculum as well. This article describes how statistical tools and concepts are included in the Brigham Young University (BYU) Child and Family Studies Laboratory preschool curriculum. At BYU, children study topics as long as they are interested, and teachers use projects to create a rich learning environment. This article describes how statistical projects-such as the "Question of the Day," survey work, and experiments-are used to teach young children to pose questions, make operational definitions, summarize data, understand variation, gather data, construct bar charts, and apply the scientific method. BYU teachers also use statistical projects to teach many other important preschool skills.

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