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Criminalizing Delinquency: The Deterrent Effects of the New York Juvenile Offender Law

Simon I. Singer and David McDowall
Law & Society Review
Vol. 22, No. 3 (1988), pp. 521-536
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Law and Society Association
DOI: 10.2307/3053628
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3053628
Page Count: 15
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Criminalizing Delinquency: The Deterrent Effects of the New York Juvenile Offender Law
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Abstract

New York's Juvenile Offender (JO) Law of 1978 is a significant step away from separate systems of justice for adults and juveniles. The law requires that juveniles accused of violent offenses be tried in criminal court, and it provides penalties comparable to those for adults. This paper evaluates the impact of the JO Law on violent juvenile crime rates in New York City and in upstate New York. Analyzing arrest data through the use of an interrupted time series model, we conclude that the JO Law has not been effective in reducing juvenile crime.

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