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Governmental Tort Litigation and the Balance of Power

Kenneth O. Eikenberry
Public Administration Review
Vol. 45, Special Issue: Law and Public Affairs (Nov., 1985), pp. 742-745
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public Administration
DOI: 10.2307/3135030
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3135030
Page Count: 4
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Governmental Tort Litigation and the Balance of Power
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Abstract

In the last decade there has been unheralded expansion of governmental tort liability, primarily due to rulings by state and federal courts. Tort liability imposes a financial punishment on public administrators, but it also has broader consequences for the legislative and executive branches. Focusing on some of the problems facing the state of Washington arising from litigation over tort liability, the author provides a view of the underlying forces and consequences of the expansion of governmental tort liability.

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