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Griphobilharzia amoena n. gen., n. sp. (Digenea: Schistosomatidae), a Parasite of the Freshwater Crocodile Crocodylus johnstoni (Reptilia: Crocodylia) from Australia, with the Erection of a New Subfamily, Griphobilharziinae

Thomas R. Platt, David Blair, J. Purdie and L. Melville
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 77, No. 1 (Feb., 1991), pp. 65-68
DOI: 10.2307/3282558
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3282558
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Griphobilharzia amoena n. gen., n. sp. (Digenea: Schistosomatidae), a Parasite of the Freshwater Crocodile Crocodylus johnstoni (Reptilia: Crocodylia) from Australia, with the Erection of a New Subfamily, Griphobilharziinae
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Abstract

Griphobilharzia amoena n. gen., n. sp. is described from wild and farm-reared freshwater crocodiles, Crocodylus johnstoni, from the Northern Territory, Australia. The male digene is distomate, with ceca that terminate just posterior to the beginning of the gynecophoric region. There is a single oval testis located between the posterior end of the gynecophoric region and the posterior end of the body. The female is enclosed completely in a gynecophoric chamber of uncertain origin, and lies anti-parallel to the male. The female lacks an acetabulum, and it produces thin-shelled eggs. A new subfamily Griphobilharziinae (family Schistosomatidae) is proposed to contain the new species. The presence of a schistosome in a member of the Crocodylia suggests that the origin of dioecy occurred prior to the divergence of the avian lineage from the ancestral archosaurs.

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