If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Marine Algal Toxins: Origins, Health Effects, and Their Increased Occurrence

Frances M. Van Dolah
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 108, Supplement 1: Reviews in Environmental Health, 2000 (Mar., 2000), pp. 133-141
DOI: 10.2307/3454638
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3454638
Page Count: 9
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Marine Algal Toxins: Origins, Health Effects, and Their Increased Occurrence
Preview not available

Abstract

Certain marine algae produce potent toxins that impact human health through the consumption of contaminated shellfish and finfish and through water or aerosol exposure. Over the past three decades, the frequency and global distribution of toxic algal incidents appear to have increased, and human intoxications from novel algal sources have occurred. This increase is of particular concern, since it parallels recent evidence of large-scale ecologic disturbances that coincide with trends in global warming. The extent to which human activities have contributed to their increase therefore comes into question. This review summarizes the origins and health effects of marine algal toxins, as well as changes in their current global distribution, and examines possible causes for the recent increase in their occurrence.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141