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The Concurrent Decline of the Native Celastrus scandens and Spread of the Non-Native Celastrus orbiculatus in the New York City Metropolitan Area

Angela M. Steward, Steven E. Clemants and Gerry Moore
The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society
Vol. 130, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 2003), pp. 143-146
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/3557536
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3557536
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Concurrent Decline of the Native Celastrus scandens and Spread of the Non-Native Celastrus orbiculatus in the New York City Metropolitan Area
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Abstract

Before 1950, native Celastrus scandens (American bittersweet) was rather common in the New York Metropolitan area. Celastrus orbiculatus (Oriental bittersweet) was introduced into the region in the late 1800s. Analyses of the distribution of both species since the time of the introduction of C. scandens into the flora indicate that the native C. scandens has declined considerably, while the non-native C. orbiculatus has significantly spread and increased in abundance. Possible reasons for the concomitant decline of C. scandens and spread of C. orbiculatus are discussed.

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