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Ocotea usambarensis and Its Fungal Decayers in Natural Stands

P. Renvall and T. Niemelä
Bulletin du Jardin botanique National de Belgique / Bulletin van de Nationale Plantentuin van België
Vol. 62, No. 1/4 (Sep. 30, 1993), pp. 403-414
DOI: 10.2307/3668286
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3668286
Page Count: 12
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Ocotea usambarensis and Its Fungal Decayers in Natural Stands
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Abstract

Ocotea usambarensis Engl., or East African camphor, is a valuable indigenous tree in Tanzania, and is confined to the high mountains of Africa. In this paper ten polypore species (Basidiomycetes) are reported from the West Usambara Mountains, northeastern Tanzania: Ganoderma australe (Fr.) Pat., Loweporus inflexibilis (Berk.) Ryv., L. roseoalbus (Jungh.) Ryv., Phellinus allardii (Bres.) Ryv., P. apiahynus (Speg.) Rajchenb. & Wright, P. gilvus (Schw.) Pat., P. senex (Nees & Mont.) Imaz., Spongipellis pachyodon (Pers.) Kotl. & Pouz., Trametes versicolor (Fr.) Pilát and Wrightoporia avellanea (Bres.) Pouz. They were growing either on old, living camphor trees, on stumps, or on dead, fallen trunks. These fungi are here reported for the first time on Ocotea usambarensis. Some ecological and pathological notes are given. Spongipellis pachyodon and Phellinus apiahynus are new to Africa. Loweporus inflexibilis and Phellinus apiahynus are the most harmful decay-causing polypores of Ocotea.

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