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Journal Article

Population Density, Movements, and Habitat Use of Bobcats in Arkansas

Richard A. Rucker, Michael L. Kennedy, Gary A. Heidt and Michael J. Harvey
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 34, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 101-108
DOI: 10.2307/3671814
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3671814
Page Count: 8

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Topics: Bobcats, Habitats, Female animals, Summer, Habitat preferences, Forest habitats, Hardwoods, Winter, Spring, Animals
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Population Density, Movements, and Habitat Use of Bobcats in Arkansas
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Abstract

The bobcat (Felis rufus) was studied in a $71.3\text{-km}^{2}$ area in western Arkansas from 1982 to 1984. Minimum density averaged 1 bobcat/$9.6\ \text{km}^{2}$. Home ranges were determined for six radiocollared bobcats. A home range of $64.2\ \text{km}^{2}$ was estimated for an adult male, and three adult females averaged $24.5\ \text{km}^{2}$ using a minimum area method. Adults retained their home ranges with no major shifts throughout the study. The mean movement rate for all bobcats was 2.2 km/h, and movement rates for individual bobcats varied seasonally. Density estimates and home ranges were similar to those reported for bobcats in mountainous habitats of Oklahoma and Missouri. Habitats most frequently selected by bobcats were 0- to 20-year-forest regeneration and mature-hardwood timber stands.

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