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The Politics of Insanity: Law, Crime, and Human Responsibility

Lawrence Zelic Freedman
Political Psychology
Vol. 4, No. 1 (Mar., 1983), pp. 171-178
DOI: 10.2307/3791182
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3791182
Page Count: 8
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The Politics of Insanity: Law, Crime, and Human Responsibility
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Abstract

The legal response to Hinckley's shooting of the President reflected a politically motivated reaction toward restriction of the criteria for responsibility which exculpates from punishment. This phenomenon is cyclical. The progressive and humanistic emphasis on the psychological state of the alleged attacker reasserts itself over time until the next major political crisis is precipitated by an attack on a head of state.

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