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Belief in Conspiracy Theories

Ted Goertzel
Political Psychology
Vol. 15, No. 4 (Dec., 1994), pp. 731-742
DOI: 10.2307/3791630
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3791630
Page Count: 12
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Belief in Conspiracy Theories
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Abstract

A survey of 348 residents of southwestern New Jersey showed that most believed that several of a list of 10 conspiracy theories were at least probably true. People who believed in one conspiracy were more likely to also believe in others. Belief in conspiracies was correlated with anomia, lack of interpersonal trust, and insecurity about employment. Black and hispanic respondents were more likely to believe in conspiracy theories than were white respondents. Young people were slightly more likely to believe in conspiracy theories, but there were few significant correlations with gender, educational level, or occupational category.

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