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What Is a de Minimis Risk?

Martin Peterson
Risk Management
Vol. 4, No. 2 (2002), pp. 47-55
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3867756
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
What Is a de Minimis Risk?
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Abstract

The de minimis principle prescribes that decision makers ought to ignore sufficiently improbable risks in the decision-making process. In this paper we discuss three popular explications of this principle, and argue that none of these is satisfactory. It is concluded that the concept of negligible risk is vague, ie that there is no sharp line to be drawn between negligible and non-negligible risks.

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