Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Size Dimorphism, Intrasexual Competition, and Sexual Section in Wattled Jacana (Jacana jacana), a Sex-Role-Reversed Shorebird in Panama

Stephen T. Emlen and Peter H. Wrege
The Auk
Vol. 121, No. 2 (Apr., 2004), pp. 391-403
DOI: 10.2307/4090403
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4090403
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Size Dimorphism, Intrasexual Competition, and Sexual Section in Wattled Jacana (Jacana jacana), a Sex-Role-Reversed Shorebird in Panama
Preview not available

Abstract

We studied sexual size dimorphism, intrasexual competition, and sexual selection in an individually marked population of Wattled Jacanas (Jacana jacana) in the Republic of Panama. Males are the sole incubators of eggs (28-day incubation) and primary providers of chick care (50-60 days). Females were 48% heavier than, and behaviorally dominant over, males. Females also showed greater development of secondary sexual characters (fleshy facial ornamentation and wing spurs) than males. Both sexes defended territories throughout the year against same-sex conspecifics. Competition for territorial space was intense, and many individuals of both sexes did not become breeders. Resident females further competed with one another to accumulate multiple mates, resulting in a mating system of simultaneous polyandry. Female and male residents (territory holders) were larger, heavier, and more ornamented than adult floaters of the same sex. Larger and heavier females also had more mates than smaller females. Body size was thus a critical predictor of success in intrasexual competition for territories (both sexes) and for mates (females). Three measures of sexual selection - (1) sex difference in the opportunity for sexual selection, (2) female-to-male ratio of potential reproductive rates, and (3) operational sex ratio - each indicated that sexual selection is currently operating more strongly on females than on males (female-to-male ratios ranged from 1.43:1 to 2.22:1). Values of 1.61:1 and 1.43:1 represent the first published quantitative estimates of the opportunity for sexual selection for any sex-role-reversed bird. Our study supports the theory that when increased parental care entails reduced opportunities for future reproduction, asymmetries in parental care behaviors of the sexes can influence the intensity of competition for mates and the direction and strength of sexual selection. /// Estudiamos el dimorfismo sexual en el tamaño, la competencia intrasexual y la selección sexual en una población de Jacana jacana con individuos marcados en la República de Panamá. Los machos son los únicos que incuban los huevos (la incubación toma 28 días) y son los principales encargados de cuidar a los pichones (50-60 días). Las hembras fueron un 48% más pesadas que los machos y fueron comportamentalmente dominantes sobre éstos. Las hembras también mostraron un mayor desarrollo de caracteres sexuales secundarios (ornamentaciones carnosas en la cara y espuelas en las alas) que los machos. Ambos sexos defendieron territorios contra individuos coespecíficos del mismo sexo a través del año. La competencia por el espacio territorial fue intensa, y muchos individuos de ambos sexos no se reprodujeron. Las hembras residentes además compitieron entre ellas por acumular múltiples parejas, lo que resultó en un sistema de apareamiento de poliandría simultánea. Las hembras y machos residentes (dueños de territorios) fueron más grandes, más pesados y más ornamentados que los adultos flotantes de su mismo sexo. Las hembras más grandes y pesadas también tuvieron más parejas que las hembras más pequeñas. Por lo tanto, el tamaño corporal fue un determinante crucial del éxito en la competencia intrasexual por territorios (ambos sexos) y por parejas (hembras). Cada una de tres medidas de selección sexual - (1) la diferencia entre sexos en la oportunidad de selección sexual, (2) la relación hembras-machos en las tasas reproductivas potenciales y (3) la proporción operacional de sexos - indicó que la selección sexual está operando actualmente con mayor intensidad en las hembras que en los machos (las relaciones hembras-machos variaron entre 1.43:1 y 2.22:1). Los valores de 1.61:1 y 1.43:1 representan las primeras estimaciones cuantitativas publicadas de la oportunidad de selección sexual en aves con roles sexuales revertidos. Nuestro estudio apoya la teoría que propone que cuando una mayor inversión en cuidado parental reduce las oportunidades para la reproducción futura, las asimetrías en los comportamientos de cuidado parental de los sexos pueden influenciar la intensidad de la competencia por parejas y la dirección y magnitud de la selección sexual.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
391
    391
  • Thumbnail: Page 
392
    392
  • Thumbnail: Page 
393
    393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
394
    394
  • Thumbnail: Page 
395
    395
  • Thumbnail: Page 
396
    396
  • Thumbnail: Page 
397
    397
  • Thumbnail: Page 
398
    398
  • Thumbnail: Page 
399
    399
  • Thumbnail: Page 
400
    400
  • Thumbnail: Page 
401
    401
  • Thumbnail: Page 
402
    402
  • Thumbnail: Page 
403
    403