Journal Article

Assessment of the relationships of geographic variation in species richness to climate and landscape variables within and among lineages of North American freshwater fishes

Jason H. Knouft and Lawrence M. Page
Journal of Biogeography
Vol. 38, No. 12 (December 2011), pp. 2259-2269
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/41310582
Page Count: 11
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Abstract

Aim: Geographic variation in species richness is a well-studied phenomenon. However, the unique response of individual lineages to environmental gradients in the context of general patterns of biodiversity across broad spatial scales has received limited attention. The focus of this research is to examine relationships between species richness and climate, topographic heterogeneity and stream channel characteristics within and among families of North American freshwater fishes. Location: The United States and Canada. Methods: Distribution maps of 828 native species of freshwater fishes were used to generate species richness estimates across the United States and Canada. Variation in species richness was predicted using spatially explicit models incorporating variation in climate, topography and/or stream channel length and stream channel diversity for all 828 species as well as for the seven largest families of freshwater fishes. Results: The overall gradient of species richness in North American freshwater fishes is best predicted by a model incorporating variables describing climate and topography. However, the response of species richness to particular climate or landscape variables differed among families, with models possessing the highest predictive ability incorporating data on climate, topography and/or stream channel characteristics within a region. Main conclusions: The correlations between species richness and abiotic variables suggest a strong influence of climate and physical habitat on the structuring of regional assemblages of North American freshwater fishes. However, the relationship between these variables and species richness varies among families, suggesting the importance of phylogenetic constraints on the regulation of geographic distributions of species.

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