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What No Bedtime Story Means: Narrative Skills at Home and School

Shirley Brice Heath
Language in Society
Vol. 11, No. 1 (Apr., 1982), pp. 49-76
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4167291
Page Count: 28
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What No Bedtime Story Means: Narrative Skills at Home and School
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Abstract

"Ways of taking" from books are a part of culture and as such are more varied than current dichotomies between oral and literate traditions and relational and analytic cognitive styles would suggest. Patterns of language use related to books are studied in three literate communities in the South-eastern United States, focusing on such "literacy events" as bedtime story reading. One community, Maintown, represents mainstream, middle-class school-oriented culture; Roadville is a white mill community of Appalachian origin; the third, Trackton, is a black mill community of recent rural origin. The three communities differ strikingly in their patterns of language use and in the paths of language socialization of their children. Trackton and Roadville are as different from each other as either is from Maintown, and the differences in preschoolers' language use are reflected in three different patterns of adjustment to school. This comparative study shows the inadequacy of the prevalent dichotomy between oral and literate traditions, and points also to the inadequacy of unilinear models of child language development and dichotomies between types of cognitive styles. Study of the development of language use in relation to written materials in home and community requires a broad framework of sociocultural analysis.

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